tvol is Timothy Vollmer. I'm a bicyclist, cook, and policy guy living in Oakland, CA.

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To the extent possible under law, Timothy Vollmer has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this work. This work is published from: United States.

 

Ft Mason with bridge.  (at Fort Mason Center)

Ft Mason with bridge. (at Fort Mason Center)

at The Interval at Long Now

at The Interval at Long Now

at The Interval at Long Now

at The Interval at Long Now

Given the savagery of the Foley video, it’s easy in isolation to cheer for its banning on Twitter. But that’s always how censorship functions: it invariably starts with the suppression of viewpoints which are so widely hated that the emotional response they produce drowns out any consideration of the principle being endorsed.

Oakland terrified of itself.  (at Snow Park)

Oakland terrified of itself. (at Snow Park)

wedding drinking vessels

wedding drinking vessels

at San Francisco City Hall

at San Francisco City Hall

By any reasonable standard the product of government-funded research should belong to the public. And indeed, it DOES belong to the public, until the moment that authors assign their copyright over to journals. All the DOE has to do is forbid their authors from assigning copyright to publishers and instead place them in the public domain. This would not only ensure public access, but would also enable researchers and companies access to the full contents to develop new and interesting ways to use the results of publicly-funded research.

The [Committee on Public Information] was a catalyst for government opinion-molding, which has become so pervasive it is impossible to identify all the people who engage in it during all or part of their workday. It also is a lesson in a fundamental threat to democracy — the too-easy morphing of wholesome government information that the public needs to reach sound opinions into the distortion and suppression of information inconvenient to a leader’s objectives.

Stanford Admits First Middle Class Student

oaklandunseen:

(Image credit: Stanford University)

In an effort to change its status as the snobbiest city in America, the Palo-Alto-based Stanford University has admitted its first middle class student. With tuition at a staggering $42,000 per year, plus room and board and country club fees, Stanford officials said that they don’t typically admit students whose families make under $200K per year, but made an exception for this fall’s freshman class.